12Sep 2020

Black Lives Matter is interesting. Many groups, including photographers are lining up to make statement about it and it is interesting to put it lightly. HDR School has said nothing for a reason.

As photographers, it is the role to record the image and tell the story, not make the story. As visual storytellers, I support photographers that want to tell the story. This is true in all cases.

However, I am concerned that many photographers are not there to be storytellers but instead they want to control the narrative. They do not want to tell the story as it is, where it lay. They want to tell what fits their political view.

An example of this is Jared Polin who went on tour with Bernie Sanders but has repeatly mocked and showed disdain for President Donald Trump. He was not there to just tell a story but use his influence to push a political narrative.

If you are paid as a photojournalist and letting your political ideals control what you tell, you have become very unprofessional and should put down your camera until you can do it honestly.

There is no excuse for people in the photography industry that have become basically whores for their favorite politicians.

So why I am not out there.

 

I have very serious reservations about these protests and the political foundations of these movements. In other words, I have very strong opinions about how they conduct themselves.

I support the President. I am a registered Republican. I believe that we stand for the flag (and kneel for the Cross!) As you can see, I would have my own conflict of interest.

It would be dishonest of me to be in the heat of the protests trying to get images of a movement that I strongly disagree with politically just to sell the pictures to the local newspaper.

Why?

Because I would get the images that I want so I could control the views of anyone reading the paper the next day. I would be there with a mission and telling the story would not be that mission.

This is the very concern that I have for some of these photographers that are covering it with their severe political convictions.

They are not telling a story; they are advancing their narrative.

Black Lives Matter is a symptom

This year has shown us a larger problem with in the photography community about this. The same control of narrative has been happening with the health crisis we find ourselves in the middle of it.

Photographers were telling the part of the story that they want  to tell; not only telling the other side to mock it or show disdain.

This is not good for the community. It is not good for the industry. It is not good for America.

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